Biggie

biggie

Biggie by Derek E. Sullivan, is a story about Henry Abbott, or Biggie, as he is nicknamed. He is high school boy who wants nothing more that to be left alone.  Biggie weighs over 300 pounds and has somehow found a way to disappear.  He has gotten very good at being invisible.  After pitching a no-hitter game of Wiffle ball in gym class that all changes.

This book shows the worst and the best sides of high school.  The bullying, the cheating, the playing, how shallow the people can be, and how little they know about the world.  It is easy to get caught up in that because there are more characters that fit this description, but Henry is not one of those.  Yes, he is a teenage boy, so he has hormones, but he does care about others, even if he goes about caring for them in the wrong ways.  Henry shows us that high school can be a place where you can reinvent yourself as hard as it might be.  He also becomes a very motivating character.  You’ll just have to read it to find out how.

Some of the biggest things that I think that book teaches about is trying to fit in, learning from people that we NEVER thought we would learn from, and second chances.  I think, most of all, this story reminded me that no one is perfect.  Everyone trips and falls at some point.  Eventually we all quit something.  Sometimes we start again and sometimes we don’t, and that’s ok.  Unfortunately, because we are not perfect, we are constantly judging others.  The “cool group” judges Henry based on his behaviors and he judges them.  I was reminded that it is ok to be weird, and it is ok to be completely normal.

Overall, it was an enjoyable story.  It was definitely slow at the beginning and I often found myself asking if it was going anywhere, but eventually a good story developed and I found myself getting caught up in the romanticism of baseball and the inner thoughts of a teenage boy.

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